Birds in Hong Kong

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Hong Kong is never a place that I really thought of as a ‘birdy’ place. Earlier this year I had the opportunity to spend a week there, and I was blown away by just how many birds I saw without ever leaving the island.

Black KiteThe very first morning I woke up and stepped out onto our tiny balcony near Times Square, I was astounded to see no less than five Black Kites kettling around the massive Lee Gardens building, riding the winds that blew against the skyscraper as an elevator into the sky. I watched for what seemed like hours as they rose up, flew off, and new ones came to replace them.

Every now and then one of them would take a lazy swing at their reflection in the plate glass windows, but it seemed more playful than anything else. Once they reached the top of the building, they swung off into the foggy Hong Kong skyline, or disappeared behind other buildings. This was not what I had expected.

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That was Hong Kong all over for me, though; Unexpected. Just a short ride down Hennessy Road on the “ding-ding” tram was Hong Kong Park, home to the Edward Youde Aviary, a free mini bird-zoo where you could see many different birds up close. Although they were in an enclosed area, much of it was open and Mynah birds and fancy pigeons had plenty of trees to fly around, as visitors walked on elevated walkways beneath. One especially relaxed Victorias Crowned Pigeon even sat incubating eggs on a nest nearby.

Cockatoos

Red-whiskered Bulbul

Blue whistling thrushMasked Laughing Thrush

But even outside the aviary the trees were bursting with birdlife, including a colony of Sulfur Crested Cockatoos, who I watched gleefully excavating nesting cavities in dead trees. Near a small waterfall, Red-whiskered Bulbuls bathed on a stone, joined by the occasional Masked Laughingthrush or Blue Whistling-Thrush, while Japanese White-eyes and Red-billed Blue-Magpies gave brief glances from the higher branches and Black-collared Starlings searched for insects in the grass.

Indochinese YuhinaFork-tailed Sunbird

A short cable-car ride up the Peak Tram from Hong Kong Park was Victoria Peak, overlooking Victoria Harbor and the Kowloon Peninsula. The Peak itself was a bit of a tourist trap, but a short walk on the trail around the peak led to Lung Fu Shan Country Park, and a whole host of new birds for me, like the petite Indochinese Yuhina and the glittering Fork-tailed Sunbird.

Greater Necklaced LaughingthrushSpotted DoveDurian Redstart

On the short trail down to an abandoned military bunker, we flushed a Greater Necklaced Laughingthrush, and it gave us a withering stare before flitting off into the bushes. Among the bunkers Spotted Doves pecked in the dirt, and a tiny Durian Redstart peeped at us through the trees. Black-throated Laughingthrushes were hiding all along the bamboo thicket lining the trail, and although we could hear their melodious calls, they gave only fleeting glances until we recorded their call, and played it back to them. Then they ventured quite close, cocking their heads inquisitively at the recording and singing in reply.

Black-throated Laughingthrush

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